Foxconn Technology to enter EV market

by Jonathan Adams
Foxconn Technology

In March, Foxconn said it was considering making electric vehicles in either Mexico or at Wisconsin plant, which was first announced in 2017 and has since been scaled back

Foxconn Technology Group, the world’s largest electronics maker, has signed a deal to buy a huge auto assembly plant in Ohio from startup electric truck maker Lordstown Motors, the companies announced Thursday.

The agreement stands to give Taiwan-based Foxconn, best known for making Apple iPhones, an entry into the growing electric vehicle market, a move it has been looking at for months.

It also brings much-needed funding to struggling Lordstown Motors, which has been under increasing scrutiny over its lack of orders and said last month that it couldn’t guarantee that it will last through the year.

The two companies announced a nonbinding agreement to negotiate a deal under which Lordstown would sell the former General Motors plant in Ohio near Youngstown, excluding some assets, for $230 million.

Foxconn will also buy about $50 million of Lordstown Motors’ stock, which rose over 8 percent in Thursday’s regular-session trading but is still down 60 percent for the year. It rose another 7 percent later.

In March, Foxconn said it was considering making electric vehicles in either Mexico or at Wisconsin plant, which was first announced in 2017 and has since been scaled back.

Company Chairman Young Liu said at the time that Foxconn wants to take 10 percent of the market share of electric vehicles by making entire vehicles or components.

Then in May, Foxconn and Stellantis, the world’s fourth-largest automaker formed by the merger of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and PSA Peugeot, announced they’re developing a jointly operated automotive supplier focusing on technology to make vehicles more connected.

The agreement with Lordstown gives Foxconn a sprawling manufacturing site where GM built cars for more than 50 years before closing the plant in 2019.

Lordstown promised to revive the plant after acquiring it in 2019 and had planned to begin production of its marquee Endurance pickup truck in September. Its investors include GM, which took a 5 percent stake.

But Lordstown has struggled to raise money, gone through management shakeups and faced increasing scrutiny from federal regulators.



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